The Gospel of Mark
Syllabus
Takoma Park Presbyterian Church
Adult Education
Spring, 2000
Mary G. Hynes

This syllabus is designed to guide our study of the Gospel of Mark until Easter. We will begin with an introduction to Mark by Rev. Dr. Sharon Ringe, Professor of New Testament at Wesley Theological Seminary. Please make sure that you read the Gospel of Mark in its entirety (it is a really short gospel) in anticipation of her lecture. If you are interested in further introductory information, I have made some suggestions below. The materials are all available from me.

For each class other than the introductory class, I have divided the reading into the primary text, the secondary texts, and material for thought. The primary text is the material from Mark. I suggest the New Revised Standard Version but any text will do. Dr. Ringe required us to use Rhoads, Dewey and Michie's translation in Mark as Story for her course in Mark because it best captures the flavor of Mark's Greek.

The secondary texts are general exegeses on the primary text. Clifton Black's Mark in the Journey Through the Bible series is a very readable, solid, Methodist adult education text. We have ten copies of this text available. Pheme Perkins' "Mark" in Volume VIII of the New Interpreter's Bible is a standard exigetical resource for mainline reformed Protestant clergy and seminarians. I can make this resource available to anyone who is interested in using it as a commentary. Ched Myers' Binding the Strong Man is a political reading of Mark and is generally recognized as one of the most scholarly and thorough exegesis in print. We have five copies of this text available. A more popular version of this text is Myers' Say to This Mountain (Orbis: N.Y.) (1996), chapters of which I have suggested throughout the syllabus.

The material for thought reflects contemporary exegesis of more discrete pericopes and themes from a variety of different perspectives (e.g., Hebrew Bible influences, feminist readings, Third World perspectives, contemporary scholarship, etc.). Many of these readings are from articles or essays in scholarly journals or other publications. Other readings are chapters from different commentaries and anthologies about Mark. Some of this reading is fairly dense. Some is more popular. Please let me know which texts, if any, you are interested in and I will make sure to have them available for you.

The readings are all suggested. You can do as much or as little as you are inclined to do and still, hopefully, benefit from the class. If you are interested in doing any of the readings in the material for thought section, please let me know the week before so I can have enough copies to hand out. I don't need to teach every class, although I am happy to start the ball rolling. I look forward to exploring Mark with you.

For more information concerning this class, contact the Church Office at 301-270-5550.

January 23:


Introduction to the Gospel of Mark
Guest Lecturer Rev. Dr. Sharon Ringe, Wesley Theological Seminary

Reading:

January 30:


Primary text:  

Secondary texts:
Material for thought:

February 6:


Primary text:  

Secondary texts:
Material for thought:

February 13:


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Secondary texts:
Material for thought:

February 20:


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Secondary texts:
Material for thought:

February 27:


Primary text:   

Secondary texts:
Material for thought:

March 5:


Primary text:   

Secondary texts:
Material for thought:

March 12:


Primary text:   

Secondary texts:
Material for thought:

March 19:


Primary text:   

Secondary texts:
Material for thought:

March 26:


Primary text:   

Secondary texts:
Material for thought:

April 2:


Primary text:   

Secondary texts:
Material for thought:

April 9:


Primary text:   

Secondary Texts:
Material for thought:

April 16:


Primary text:   

Secondary texts:
Material for thought: